Old but not forgotten

Mar 2019, Cann River, Vic The Cann River Rainforest Campground was once a caravan park. It now provides a grassy 48 hour stop for those travelling the long stretch between Gippsland and the Sapphire Coast in New South Wales. The amenities are decent and there is water. The small but vibrant town of Cann River is only a very short walk away on the other side of the bridge. Advertisements Continue reading Old but not forgotten

The old pump house

Mar 2019, Orbost, Vic Orbost in Victoria’s east is situated on the fertile floodplains of the Snowy River. Rich green dairying land with plenty of cotented cows. While everyone is concentrating on emptying their toilets at the public dump point I’m captivated by water control from another era. Yes, over on the Snowy River floodplain is an old pump house. One could say that it’s a much prettier picture than a bunch of blokes lining up to empty their caravan dunnies. Continue reading The old pump house

Bad habits?

I copped a good hearted ribbing from Peter over at Peter’s Pondering the other day for not untying my shoelaces in my Wet Boots post. I could almost hear my Mum turning in her grave…”I suppose you’ll be putting on shirts without undoing the buttons next!” Guilty, especially those shirts that gape and need to be restrained with a few stitches here and there. After all no one wants to see an old duck’s bra. But I digress. The bane of caravanners is the need for shoes that can be slipped on quickly when leaping out the door backwards. Shoes … Continue reading Bad habits?

Marlay Point

Mar 2019, Marlay Point, Lake Wellington, Vic Just out of Sale in Victoria, you’ll find a freedom camp on the shores of Lake Wellington. There is lakeside camping on grassy areas and on bitumen. There is a toilet block. The birdlife here is fabulous and the nights are peaceful. Gazing across Lake Wellington will give you some appreciation of the immense size of the Gippsland Lakes. Continue reading Marlay Point

Wet boots!

The best reason to pull out your awning is to provide shelter. Shelter from the blazing sun and to keep your boots dry when it rains. Anticipating an early morning start we retracted our awning and retired for the night. An hour or so later a theatrical summer thunderstorm came through. It was warm and muggy and the rain thumped heavily while the clouds boomed, a welcome relief from hot dry bushfire weather. Next morning we were reminded that we’d forgotten to bring our boots in for the night. I guess we’d become used to those hot dry conditions. Continue reading Wet boots!