Like a Rollingstone, Day 27 – Washing has never been such fun

Day 27, Sunday, 5/6/2016, Emerald, Sunny

While we are here in Emerald we must visit the gem fields. The triangle of towns Anakie, Sapphire and Rubyvale are only 44kms west of here. Woody suggests that we check out the Sunday market in Sapphire as miners like to sell their finds at these. Sure enough, there is only one stall of fruit and vegetables and many stalls (if you can call an ironing board a stall) selling gem stones in a variety of settings. Now I’m sure you’re wondering how people could be selling expensive jewellery from an ironing board without any security…but I haven’t mentioned the dogs. Big ugly dogs, almost as ugly as the miners themselves and chained to anything solid. One wouldn’t want to haggle over prices with these scary fellas.

The town blocks in Sapphire seem to have border issues. There is no mistaking where the boundaries are. Electric fences, keep out signs and more guard dogs denote borders. One guy even has a fence around his property made of cattle truck gates. Most blocks have a mine and a rough shanty for a house. 

Rubyvale, Qld

Rubyvale on the other hand looks positively civilised. It is only a few kilometres to the north and on the tropical side of the Tropic of Capricorn. The houses are more permanent, more respectable and there are shops! And a pub.

Out of curiosity we follow a sign to Willy’s Wash and spend $15 for a bucket of ‘wash’ or should I say gravel. A bubbly lady called Karen shows us how to wash the wash in a Willoughby. Which is a dunker that sluices your colander of wash. We upend the colander of wet Willoughby’d wash onto a hessian bag and set to with a pair of tweezers to sort through the pile of now clean gravel to find the sapphires. I am eternally grateful to Karen for showing us what to look for because of all the stones the pretty ones turn out to be rubbish and the stuff that looks like bits of black road gravel are the sapphires. An hour or more passes as we wash wash and pick at tiny bits of gravel. I am so engrossed with this fossicking caper that I fail to notice that the mine is actually beside us until Karen’s partner who is working the mine pops up with more dirt, sorry wash.

Karen, a Kiwi, tells us that she has been hooked on gems since she was fifteen, almost as long as she’s been hooked on her partner. They went their separate ways then chanced upon each other again a few years ago. One night she got a call from him and he said “I’ve bought you your dream.” He had bought her the sapphire mine, house and business. One look at Karen’s smile and you can see that she is truly living the dream.

Did we find any of that ‘black gravel’? Sure did and when you hold them up to the light they sparkle, blue, green and orange. I think I could get hooked on this washing caper too but I doubt that our gems would cover the cost of our lunch at the Rubyvale pub.

Towing Kms: 0

Willy’s Wash, the blue contraptions are Willoughbys and the upright PVC post (centre) is ventilation for the mine underneath

10 thoughts on “Like a Rollingstone, Day 27 – Washing has never been such fun

  1. Well, that looks like good clean fun! And what is WP up to? It doesn’t like me Following you. This is the second time it’s knocked you off my list, and you’re not alone. All very odd.

    Like

    1. No, as far back as I can remember this was always a fossicking area. There are public fossicking spots and some people own small blocks of land. My parents neighbours used to spend their annual holidays there and I could never understand it until we visited.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. A lot of scratching about and of course metal detecting is a popular hobby for those with a penchant for the yellow stuff. The one I’ve found the most interesting is an Opal town called White Cliffs in outback New South Wales. We flew in there once and from the air it is a large ‘plug’ of Opal bearing clay? The residents burrow in from the sides and make their very comfortable homes. On that trip we stayed in an underground hotel which was very dark once the lights were off!

        Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply to Itching for Hitching Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s